Growing For Profit – Urban Farming – $75,000 on 1/3 acre

Make Money Gardening In Your Backyard

Growing For Profit – Urban Farming - $75,000 on 1/3 acre

Curtis Stone is a hard working and driven man who started his own business using other people’s backyards for farming in an urban environment. He calls this Profitable Urban Farming. After some years he managed to purchase the land where he planted his first crop, ultimately turning it into his base of operations. Eventually he had to develop his own online course in order to teach all the people who were requesting for advice about this method and system of selling and growing crops. He is so dedicated on sharing his knowledge and experience that he succeeded in turning his neighbors into friends and allies in this quest for sustainability. Curtis is not just a farmer, but also an author, consultant and speaker on topics such as quick growing and high values annual vegetables for direct consumer market streams. In his book called The Urban Farmer he introduces organic intensive techniques centered on business and systems to streamline labor market. This became an alternative to conventional farming, an approach where there is a direct link between quality of life and profit.

Growing For Profit – Urban Farming - $75,000 on 1/3 acre

Growing For Profit – Urban Farming - $75,000 on 1/3 acre Growing For Profit – Urban Farming - $75,000 on 1/3 acre

His farm is situated in Kelowna, BC, Canada since 2010, and is called Green City Acres. The farm generates over $75,000 per year on only one third of an acre, in an eight month growing season, and is globally recognized with regards to agriculture productivity and profitability in an urban context You can learn more about Curtis Stone and his farming experience by visiting The Urban Farmer, a channel where he shares his knowledge about urban farming.

Source: http://www.goodshomedesign.com/urban-farming-growing-for-profit-75000-on-13-acre/

One thought on “Growing For Profit – Urban Farming – $75,000 on 1/3 acre

  • April 3, 2016 at 2:05 am
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    I could tear 1/16 inch thick 36 inch long items of bass timber or
    balsa all day with mine, and also it’s a thousand times
    more secure compared to aiming to do it making use of a table
    saw.

    Reply

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